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Springville Journal Election 2012 coverage: United States Senate

Kirsten Gillibrand
Incumbant Kirsten Gillibrand, the Democratic nominee, and Wendy Long, the Republican nominee, are running for one open seat on the New York State Senate, as well as Colia Clark, Chris Edes and John Mangelli.

Kirsten Gillibrand
Kirsten Gillibrand was sworn in as a United States senator from New York in January 2009, filling the seat of Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. In November 2010, Gillibrand won election to the seat, with 63 percent of the vote.

Prior to her service in the Senate, Gillibrand served in the United States House of Representatives, representing New York’s 20th Congressional District, which spans 10 counties in Upstate New York.

When Gillibrand was first elected, she pledged to bring transparency and access to her position. She became the first member of Congress to post her official, public schedule, personal financial disclosure and federal earmark requests online.

During her time in the Senate, Gillibrand fought to repeal “don’t ask, don’t tell.” She advocates for health care and compensation for the 9/11 first responders and community survivors who are sick with diseases contracted at Ground Zero. Gillibrand brought Democrats and Republicans together to win both. Newsweek and The Daily Beast named her “one of 150 women who shake the world.”

Gillibrand said that, “by making quality child care and higher education more affordable, providing property tax relief and keeping our neighborhoods safe, [her] legislative agenda aims to help middle class and working families.”

She wrote legislation to address the country’s nursing shortage, make autism treatment more affordable, improve asthma treatment for children and ensure that drinking water and baby products are safe for consumers.

Gillibrand said that her No. 1 priority is to rebuild the American economy, by creating jobs, helping small businesses get loans and partnering with the private sector to foster innovation and entrepreneurship. As a member of the environment and public works committees, Gillibrand has worked to increase investment in infrastructure, including drinking water and sewer systems, rural broadband, health care information technology and renewable energy, working with the Obama administration and New York Senator Charles Schumer to ensure that the state gets federal funding.

Gillibrand was the first New York senator to sit on the agriculture committee, in nearly 40 years. She is seeking to improve child nutrition and combat childhood obesity, by giving children and families more access to fresh fruits and vegetables that are grown in New York. She advocates to ensure New York’s dairy farmers are compensated for their produced milk.

After serving on the armed services committee in the House, Gillibrand is now serving on the Senate armed services, using her position in an effort to strengthen America’s armed services, national security and military readiness and to continue fighting for America’s troops and military families, by creating better economic opportunities for veterans who are returning home to their families.

From her seat on the aging committee, Gillibrand said she is committed to fighting on behalf of seniors, working to lower the cost of prescription drugs, making long-term care more affordable so seniors can remain independent for as long as they are able and protecting seniors from financial fraud.

Gillibrand is also working to lower property taxes, co-sponsoring legislation that would give New York residents a full, federal tax deduction for their property taxes.

After attending Albany’s Academy of Holy Names, Gillibrand graduated in 1984 from Emma Willard School in Troy, N.Y. A magna cum laude graduate of Dartmouth College in 1988, Gillibrand went on to receive her law degree from the University of California, Los Angeles School of Law in 1991 and served as a law clerk on the Second Circuit Court of Appeals.

After working as an attorney in New York City for more than 10 years, Gillibrand served as special counsel to United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Andrew Cuomo, during the Clinton administration. She then worked as an attorney in Upstate New York, before becoming a member of Congress.

Born and raised in Upstate New York, Gillibrand now lives in Brunswick, N.Y. with her husband Jonathan Gillibrand and their two sons, 8-year-old Theodore and 4-year-old Henry.

Wendy Long
Wendy is a New York mother, wife, attorney and volunteer.

She was raised in New Hampshire, where she attended public schools. She graduated from Dartmouth College.

During the Reagan administration, she worked in the United States Senate for U.S. Senator Gordon Humphrey and U.S. Senator Bill Armstrong. She also studied as a publius fellow with the Claremont Institute.

Long attended Northwestern University School of Law and Harvard Law School, receiving her Juris Doctor from Northwestern University, where she was an editor of that school’s law review. She served as a law clerk to Judge Ralph Winter of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the second circuit in New York and to Justice Clarence Thomas of the Supreme Court of the United States.

She practiced law with Kirkland & Ellis, LLP, becoming a litigation partner in New York City. She left the private practice to build the Judicial Confirmation Network, which is now the Judicial Crisis Network, to promote public education regarding the role of the judiciary under the American Constitution and to win U.S. Senate confirmation of Supreme Court justices and other federal judges.

Long and her husband Arthur live in Manhattan, where they are raising their two children, Arthur and Mado.

Wendy Long is a member of Governor Mitt Romney’s Justice Advisory Committee, teaches Roman Catholic catechism in New York City for the Narnia program and is a member of the New York City Parks Mounted Auxiliary Unit.
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